Coronavirus in Your Apartment Community: How To Stay Safe

  |     |   coronavirus, Tips
  • Coronavirus (COVID-19) hygiene and preparation is critical to protect yourself and your family
  • The CDC has issued a number of guidelines and instructions on how to maximize your prevention and minimize your exposure
  • Apartment dwellers face most of the same issues as the rest of the population, but also have matters unique to living in multi-family properties

Preventing coronavirus in your apartment

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has offered a number of reference articles and official statements on how to best protect yourself and your family.

But for apartment dwellers, those with common spaces, mailbox clusters, lobbies, trash chutes and a plethora of door handles, keeping safe and practicing prevention habits is a bit more difficult. From your own personal hygiene to how to manage your apartment to what to expect from your landlord, here are all the tips, suggestions and instructions straight from the CDC just for renters and apartment tenants.

 

1. Wash your hands often

Wash your hands after you touch another person or a common surface. Wash your hands before and after you touch or prepare food. Wash your hands after using the restroom. Wash your hands after you cough, sneeze or blow your nose. Wash your hands when you get home from being out.

Wash by covering all surfaces of your hands and rubbing them together until they feel dry. When you wash, rub with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Experts have recommended singing “Happy Birthday" twice. If you're tired of that, try other songs with 20-second choruses like:

  • “Take on Me" by A-ha
  • “Jolene" by Dolly Parton
  • “Raspberry Beret" by Prince
  • “Truth Hurts" by Lizzo
  • “Stayin' Alive" by the Bee Gees (like that CPR scene from “The Office")

If soap and water are not available, disinfect your hands by utilizing a 60 to 95 percent alcohol hand sanitizer and following the listed instructions.

 

2. Avoid close contact with people who are sick

This seems obvious. But since you never know who is sick, minimize contact in general, as well. Spread out on the bus or subway or in line. Touch elbows instead of shaking hands or fist-bumping, or politely decline to touch at all. Try to avoid touching common surfaces others touch in public places and in your apartment building or common areas as best you can. Don't share food or drinks.

3. Avoid touching your face

No matter how hard you try, you're going to touch unsanitary surfaces or people. To prevent infecting yourself, do your best to refrain from touching your eyes, nose or mouth, as these are the main entry points for disease.

4. Cover your mouth

If you must cough or sneeze, cover your mouth with a tissue, then throw the tissue into a trash can that has a closed cover. The same goes for blowing your nose. If you don't have a tissue, cough or sneeze into your upper sleeve like you're doing “The Dab," not into your hands.

5. Maybe forgo that face mask

According to the CDC, people who are not sick (or don't feel sick) should not wear protective face masks, because they're not effective in keeping out the very small virus. Face masks are only for people who are already symptomatic to prevent them from spreading the disease to others. The only exception is for healthcare workers or other close-contact care providers.

6. Clean and disinfect

Keep your apartment neat, clean and organized to maintain a healthy environment. Clean regularly and sanitize often using items like Lysol spray and Clorox wipes on “high touch" surfaces including countertops, tabletops, doorknobs, nightstands, bathroom fixtures, toilets, refrigerator handles, kitchen faucets, light switches, TV remotes, cell phones, computer keyboards and tablets.

7. Stock up but don't hoard

While unlikely, it's possible you may wind up quarantined in your apartment, or even just sick and self-quarantining. For that scenario, which shouldn't last longer than two weeks, you should stock up (but not hoard) a few basic items:

  • Non-perishable items like canned meat, fish, beans, soups, broths and stews, fruits and vegetables, and canned or powdered milk
  • Ready to serve items like peanut butter, jelly, crackers, nuts, trail mix, dried fruits and granola bars
  • Baby food and pet food
  • Bottled water, fruit juices and fluids like Pedialyte or Gatorade
  • Toothpaste, toilet paper, tissues, feminine supplies, diapers, laundry detergent and disinfectant
  • Hand sanitizer that's minimum 60 percent alcohol, over-the-counter cold and flu medicines and any refills of prescriptions

 

If you're sick or feel like you're getting sick

Even with all of the precautions, there is still a chance you'll contract the disease. Follow these steps the moment you begin to feel sick, even if it just feels like a cold.

1. Stay home

Unless it's to see your doctor or go to the hospital, stay in your apartment and don't go out. Don't go to work, school or to public areas. Try to avoid public transportation, taxicabs or rideshares. Not only will you not infect others, the more you stay at home and rest, the faster you'll recover. Utilize food and personal item delivery if necessary.

2. Separate yourself from others at home

As best you can, stay in a designated sick room and keep away from other people. Eat separately from others. If your apartment has more than one, designate a bathroom just for you. Avoid touching pets, as well. If you must feed or clean up after a pet, wash your hands before and after as detailed above.

3. Don't share household or personal items

Set aside drinking glasses, plates, silverware, sheets and blankets, towels and toiletries for your use and your use only. Clean them thoroughly with soap and water after every single use.

4. Wear a face mask

As mentioned above, only people who are already sick (or people caring for those that are) need to wear a face mask. If you're sick, wear one around other people (or pets) or if you go see your doctor.

5. Cover your mouth when you cough or sneeze, wash your hands

See above for details.

6. Clean and disinfect even more

Sanitize your apartment as explained above, but do it every day.

7. Call before going to the doctor

Keep an eye on your symptoms and seek medical attention if needed. Give them a heads up before you go to allow them to take precautions to keep others visiting their office from being infected or exposed. If you suspect you only have a cold or flu, consider a virtual doctor's visit. If you must call 9-1-1, inform them of your symptoms before they arrive, as well.

Additional sources:

One thought on “Coronavirus in Your Apartment Community: How To Stay Safe

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